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Hide Reboot/Shutdown buttons

Discussion in 'Plesk for Linux - 8.x and Older' started by porkchop, Sep 17, 2007.

  1. porkchop

    porkchop Guest

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    Hi all,
    I have a box which has one client (reseller) and he's a complete mental case when it comes to rebooting.

    No matter what the problem is (or what he thinks it is), he reboots the box. This he does daily, and it's getting to be annoying.

    His contract states that he has to have admin access to Plesk, so the only solution I can come up with is to hide the "Reboot" and "Shutdown" buttons in the interface completely. I never reboot any Plesk box from the web interface anyway, it's always done from the command line, so it would be no loss whatsoever to have those two buttons go away.

    Is this possible?

    Regards & TIA,
    /porky
     
  2. breun

    breun Golden Pleskian

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    You can hide buttons in Plesk, but since he has admin access he can also bring them back. :)
     
  3. porkchop

    porkchop Guest

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    Yes indeed, that's exactly the problem I've been confronting. I'm not saying he [would] but you're right of course, he [could] if he got curious enough.

    How can you hide the power management buttons (as a matter of interest).

    Perhaps as an alternative, I wonder if a lower level of admin login can be created. He's the only client on the box...so how close would a client login interface look, compared to an admin interface?

    I don't have an uncommitted box with a Plesk license on it to test this with, so if anyone has been down this or a similar road before, suggestions would be most welcome.

    /porky
     
  4. breun

    breun Golden Pleskian

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    You know, it's really not that hard to find this info:

    1. Go to the Plesk website
    2. Click on Documentation
    3. Choose the Manual for Administrators
    4. Search for 'hide button'
    5. Bingo: Hiding and Unhiding Sets of Buttons

    There are multiple levels of users that can login to Plesk: Administrator, Client, Domain Admin and E-mail User. I guess only the Administrator can reboot/shutdown the server. You could just try the Client login and see how that works for you, right? But if the contract states your client needs admin access...

    Why is exactly a problem for you when a client reboots his own server?
     
  5. porkchop

    porkchop Guest

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    Thanks for that. Before I hit the forum however, I had already read the Admin documentation - rather thoroughly in fact. I'd already attempted to accomplish the hiding of the two buttons in question - albeit unsuccessfully.

    I guess I gotta bite the bullet and try..although the client is gonna go nuts if he logs in and sees *major* differences....

    That's the problem, right there! :)

    Because Plesk is running on the same box as an authoritative nameserver. It has made life difficult for others when he's rebooted. Once a day would be OK, but sometimes he re-ups his box 3,4 times a day. Now of course there are other nameservers with replication configged, but it's still a headache when he's constantly rebooting. I tell him he doesn't need to do it, but I've had better luck talking to a lump of rock.

    I will - in time - move the nameserver off that box (temporary measure when done, long story) but for now he's causing problems for others as well as doing something which is fundamentally unnecessary.

    This is why I was pursuing what I thought was a reasonably creative solution instead of getting into it with a client (which is often a losing proposition when contract renewal time comes around)

    /porky
     
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